Do Something Every Single Day To Improve Your Squash!

Equipment

These articles have something related to equipment in them. This includes rackets, strings, balls, grips, shoes, bags and any other items.

Overall, this is a well-performing racket, if a little too powerful for my liking. In this review, I talk about what it does well and what it doesn’t do so well, as well as three types of players it will suit.

Grays Illusion 110 Squash Racket

Techs and Specs As supplied this racket weighs 144grams and has a balance point of 370mm, making it quite head heavy. Once I put a grip on top of the one supplied, which is always too thin for me, it become 156 grams and has a 350mm balance point. Don’t worry too much about the difference in the name “110” and the actual weight “144” because manufacturers always use the base frame wight, i.e. no string,s grip, grommets etc. The frame is quite wide giving it a very solid feel and making the racket quite stiff. The strings are “Graytech” and seem acceptable. The tension was a little higher than I like, but that is expected and is the right thing to do – that way they can loosen over time. Visuals You certainly couldn’t miss this racket if it were in a pile of other rackets. Some will like the bold colourway and design, whiles others won’t. I do like the yellow myself. I’m a little unclear on the addition of the spade symbol, but perhaps I am missing something?! I suppose it’s simple a love it or hate it design. Power Baby! Of all the rackets I have tested recently, this one has the most power. That’s not an important aspect for me, as my game is bsed on control, but for some that could make the difference. Unlike some other powerful rackets, the Grays Illusion 110 never felt over-powerful, as in I could still control the ball. It impresses you the moment you first start to hit the ball Touch and Kills This racket plays best when hit with a lot of slice or flat. Anything in between doesn’t seem to get the best from the frame. if you style of game is attacking the ball, then this racket should suit you. Forgiveability Forgiveability describes a racket’s ability to respond when the ball is hit outside of…

I’ve got to be crazy, right? Suggesting using an old racket. What a waste of time, right? Wrong. Read on to find out why it’s good for your squash.

Play With A Vintage Racket Once A Month

The first thing to know is that this article is not for beginners or recreational players. If you are just starting to play squash, keep with a modern, but not expensive racket and if you just play for fun with your friends, then this probably won’t interest you – but who knows, maybe it will. In my mind there are three periods of vintage racket that matter: WOODEN – basically anything from around the early 1970s to around the mid 1980s. Rackets before the UK boom of around the 70s are less common and probably should be kept on the wall for display rather than risk breaking them. They were heavy and unforgiving, but if you hit the ball it the sweetspot, they felt great.EARLY GRAPHITE – These are the types of rackets Jahangir Khan (Unsquashable), Jansher Khan (Ascot) and Rodney Martin (Prince) made popular. They were quite heavy, at least compared to today’s rackets, but were a significant step up from the wooden Dunlop Maxply Fort’s that were the king racket at that time.LATER GRAPHITE – These rackets are from around 1995 to around 2010. The can look very similar to today’s rackets and twelve years old (at the time of publication) might not seem that far back, but in terms of technology, it’s a big difference. This is the Grays Illusion 110- not vintage, but just as beautiful. So Which Should You Play With? Well, all three eras have something to offer, but put simply, the better you are and the better your swing technique, the older the racket to practice with. Do I have an exact formula for deciding how god is good enough to sue a wooden racket? No, but unless you would describe yourself as an advanced player, I would avoid the wooden rackets if I were you. How Will It Help? Firstly the weight. Using a heavier racket for at least 30 minutes certainly…

What if there was a way for you to accurately measure your swing? A way for you to record the angles and speed of you racket on impact with the ball? Well, there is!

Racketware Squash Sensor

The first thing I want to tell you is that all the information in the article is out of date! WHAT! But don’t worry, the basics are still as true now as they were when I tested the sensor. The difference is that version 2 is now available from their website racketware.co.uk. So things are even better. Let’s Start With The Basics The sensor fits onto the bottom of your racket. You need to fixed a “dock” that goes under your grip. Racketware provides a grip in the box, so there’s no wasted grips. Once the dock is in place, you then attach the sensor to it. Fear not, it’s a very firm attachment and will not come off in play. You can also purchase extra docks to fit on other rackets, making it easy to switch the sensor between rackets. The sensor itself weighs about the same as a grip and it does change the balance of the racket ever so slightly. Version 2 is lighter than version one, but even version 1 wasn’t a problem. I like head light rackets, so that helped. If you prefer head heavy rackets then it will have an effect, how much I can’t say as that depends on the weight of your racket. Just bear that in mind before purchasing. You download a free app to your phone or tablet, which is available for both Apple and Android devices, which connects to your sensor. The sensor can record the data and transfer it to your device later if you don’t have your device with you when playing – so don’t worry about having to have your phone in your pocket when playing – you don’t! Want to hit that perfect nick? What is does The sensor records all the details of your swing in a 3D model, that is presented to you in an easy-to-understand graph. It overlays lots of swings of…

Too many new players think you can keep playing with a ball until it breaks and they are wrong, Oh so very very wrong.

Don't Play With Shiny Squash Balls!

One of the constant issue new players have with squash is the balls. I am not going to lie: the way squash organizes and promotes the different squash balls is ridiculous. However, this article is about a related topic and that is shiny balls. What are shiny balls you ask? and I say, look at the photo. Can you see how the balls are not completely black? How they have a whitish surface? This is a combination of being old and collecting the paint/plaster from the wall. Think of it like a piece of sticky tape that has lost its stickiness. The fact is, that it hasn’t lost it’s stickiness but dust or other particles have stuck to it. The Effect of Shiny Balls When a squash ball is shiny, it skids on the floor. Skidding means that instead of bouncing higher it stays low and is very difficult to hit. This makes squash boring. Who wants to try to hit a skidding ball? Not me. This all comes back to the fact that because the ball is not “broken”, too many people continue to play with these balls. As a player, when somebody gets a ball like this out of their bag, refuse to play with it. make sure you have a newer one available and use that. A beautiful new squash ball! How To Clean Shiny Balls I recommend putting them in the washing machine with your sports kit at 30 degrees. the abrasion of the clothes with the ball should be enough to remove 90% of the shine. other people simple rub them on carpets or even use sandpaper, and those methods definitely work, but since I am lazy, cough cough, really busy, I use the washing machine. So, make sure you clean your squash balls! Somebody actually made a device to “scrap” squash balls clean, but after 5 minutes searching I couldn’t find it on the…

Yes, there’s no other answer, so let me repeat it.

Should I wear Squash Goggles?

Should I wear Squash Goggles?

Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. EVERY SQUASH PLAYERS SHOULD AT LEAST TRY THEM Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. A LITTLE DISCOMFORT IS WORTH THE PROTECTION Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. WE WEAR HELMETS WITHOUT COMPLAINING Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. THEY ARE NOT EXPENSIVE Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. THEY WILL LAST FOR YEARS Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.…

A lot depends on you. Are you strong? Are you having coaching or have good technique? Do you play once a week with a few friends or do you want to play local tournaments? There is no “one simple answer” because each person is different. So let’s look at the reasons those questions matter. Before we do that though, let’s talk hypothetically.

Should a beginner start with a heavy or light squash racket?

The weight of a squash racket is less important than its balance, i.e. where most of the weight is. If most of the weight of the racket is in the head, a light racket can feel heavy, and conversely, a heavier racket with most of the weight in near the handle may feel light. If you use a very light racket when you first start to play squash, your technique has to be good otherwise you generally won’t have racket solidity when you hit the ball. However, if you use a heavy racket or head heavy racket when you first start playing, you may develop bad habits because you are unable to control the racket correctly due to lack of strength. In general, I always recommend a medium weighted and medium balanced racket for new players. Over the first six months, players should try as many rackets as possible, to begin to understand what feels good in their hands, and the only way to know is to actually play with many different rackets. Cheap rackets are heavy. It’s pretty much the same for most sports equipment nowadays. Basic aluminum rackets are durable but quite heavy. If you only play recreationally and are on a limited budget, then they are perfect. In fact, a look on second-hand sites can get you a basic squash racket for 5 Pounds/Euros/Dollars etc. You can buy a brand new graphite racket for around 25 (£/€/$), but of course for that price you are not going to get a high quality frame or strings, and it is not going to be light. Mid-range graphite rackets are lighter than cheaper ones, but should feel better when using them. Personally, this is a good choice if you are sure you want to play competitively or you have progressed from once-a-week with friends into a “club squash” situation. At this point in your development, you are beginning to develop…

There is a lot of confusion regarding the colour of the dots on squash balls and their use. This confuses is NOT your fault – it is the major manufacturers’ and the World Squash Federation’s (WSF). They designate the dots as speeds: Fast (blue), Medium (red), Slow (single yellow) and Super Slow (double yellow). Over the years those dots have changed, as have the actual colour of the balls, but the way they were and are promoted is the same.

Can I Use A Red Dot Ball In Squash Solo Drills?

As a beginner, isn’t your natural thinking to avoid the fast ball and player with the slow one? I know mine would be. Those manufacturers and the WSF also promote the fact that different balls should be used on courts with different temperatures. So for example, on a very very cold court, even a pro might use a single yellow dot. That’s the theory at least, but honestly, the court would need to be almost zero degrees for that to be true. So where does that leave the average club and recreational player? Simply put, use the ball that you have the most fun with. Honestly, anything else is just confusion. There exists a group of players within squash that I call “Ball Snobs”. These players believe that because advanced players and professional squash players use a double yellow dot, that is the only ball that should be used, irrespective of age, standard or experience. |they insist that juniors play with this ball as “it is the ball they will eventually have to play with, so they might as well get used to it now”. Idiots! That’s like say a child must use an adult bike because that’s what they will eventually use. Yes, you can without a doubt use ANY colour dot squash ball you want when solo drilling. Ideally, your objective is to build up enough skill and power that you can sue a double yellow dot, but even then there are times a red dot can be useful. For example, hitting soft, short shots or practicing boasts alone. Even a hot double yellow dot would get cold quickly unless hit hard. But don’t think you can only use a red dot if you are hitting soft shots. A red dot could also be used for practice deep drives that come off the back wall. For many players, hitting the ball hard even, with accuracy so a red…